Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Each of the last 2 years we have had the immense pleasure of connecting with northerners passionate about promoting local, connecting people and place and supporting the Yukon Wildlife Preserve and Yukon’s wildlife.  The team is back again this year with new, special and very limited edition Yukon-inspired and Yukon-made wool wear.  

Only 3 hats available!

Birds Eye View small batch dye by Crux Fibres with pattern, Autumn Weaves beanie by Lindsay Faciane; hand knitted especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve by Liz Sutton adorned with indigenous Yukon-run trapline, sustainably trapped lynx fur pom.

SOLD!

The one-of-a-kind Borealis Hat and Mitt pattern by Liz Sutton can be found on Ravelry if you wish to do your own pattern yourself but the particular Aurora and Blue Lagoon hand-dye from Crux Fibre is one of a kind, especially for the Preserve adorned with sustainably and ethically Yukon trapped coyote fur pom!

The partnerships of these unique businesses and people have continued to grow and we’re really excited to release a limited edition toque and special toque and mitt combo for this holiday season – gift giving that keeps giving! These beautiful wool items were made exclusively in the north, inspired by the north and are entwined with passions and care throughout the entire process. The Yukon is home to incredible people who love to celebrate and honour the uniqueness of this land. These knitting wonders directly support the diverse community that makes this place and its people so unique!

These limited edition hats go on sale at the Preserve only on Saturday November 13.

Hand-knitted in Whitehorse

For the 3rd year in a row we are working with the ever-expanding knitting talent, Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits located right here in Whitehorse. Liz has been the cornerstone of this annual project. Year after year, despite a full time job, dog-momming, life duties and personal outdoor passion and pursuits, Liz is eager to weave through it all and dedicate time and energy into lovingly producing one-of-a-kind hand knitted and fashioned wool products, especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

Northern Inspiration in Hand Dyed 100% Merino Wool

Crux Fibres is a truly northern inspired product of born and raised Yukoner, Brittany Vogt. Her knitting hobby and desire to create her own spectrum of colours inspired by Yukon places close to her heart quickly turned into a business for Brittany. 

“The art of dyeing yarn has become a great avenue to continue my creative expression” and this particular small-batch dye was influenced by a place that holds an extra special connection for Brittany. The “Birds Eye View” she called this small-batch dye, in which Liz used to make the 3 toques, was inspired by place and time. Atop Caribou Mountain overlooking Bennett Lake, on the traditional territory of the Carcross Tagish First Nation,  Brittany realized she was going crazy for John, her now husband. Indeed, intertwined in love, years later a few pictures would further inspire the beauty and colour of this yarn. 

Brittany’s inspiration supported through Bennett Lake art from
Left: Edna Bardell Right: Ben Nelms

Every small-batch dye of 100% merino wool yarn originates from South America. Brittany worked hard to source yarn ethically and extend her values of supporting small and mindful businesses like her own.  The one-of-a-kind Aurora Borealis Hat and Mitts used a special blue lagoon dye Brittany did. The very nature of hand-dying in small batches creates variations from skein to skein (even those dyed in the same dye bath) adding even greater uniquesness to each finished product. 

Trapping – In Love & Tradition 

The finishing touches of such a divine piece of art involves a trapline, and a commitment to love, learning, and educating. It may be just a fur pom that adorns these hats but for Vanessa of Yukon Wild Furs it’s an opportunity; it’s the decision to embark on a role as an educator; fulfilling a responsibility while generating a (somewhat unexpected) life from the bounty of the land. Vanessa, along with owning and operating a small store where she sells her art, tirelessly works towards educating and connecting people to a lifestyle rooted in tradition whenever she has the opportunity. This opportunity and responsibility is shared along-side her now husband, George Bahm who is Teslin Tlingit and harvests from the land on his trappline in southern Yukon.

Photo Credit: Alistair Maitland

I have merely glimpsed a fraction of the beauty and teachings that await on the trapline. But I know that this traditional practice, with its skill, stories and lessons, will be lost if the wild fur industry continues as it is. My hope is to protect the importance of what is out on the trail, in the quiet of a fresh snowfall, so that future generations of fur harvesters can reconnect with their ancestors and the teachings that have endured for thousands of years. Trapping is so much more than just harvesting fur.

Photo Credit: Erik Pinkerton

When the opportunity came to adorn these hats (for a second year in a row) with sustainable, locally and indegenous trapped wild fur, Vanessa did not hesitate to support. She’s only a single human in this world but one with a strong, deeply rooted goal of using this polarizing issue as a springboard into meaningful conversations wherever they can occur from her store to our Little Gift Shop where these hats will be sold.

To learn more about Vanessa, George and their shared goals check out Truth About Fur

A Community That’s Wild at Heart

The Yukon Wildlife Preserve is a non-profit charitable organization. In the 1970’s Danny Nowlan started accepting and caring for injured and orphaned wildlife at the Yukon Game Farm. Nearly 50 years later the Preserve continues to care for Yukon’s most vulnerable animals. Today we are a living centre of Yukon’s species that connects tens of thousands of people, from our backyard to across the world, to the natural world, each year.

Find out more about what the  donation with the purchase of the hat means for the Preserve at donate.yukonwildlife.ca 

 These toques represent so much more than just a (stunning) fashion accessory to keep your head warm! It embodies your choice to value the connections with the people and places of this territory; to support local; to share a love of something on a deeper level; to support Yukon’s wildlife. By purchasing this hat, you are supporting the people, their businesses and the land and animals of the north – Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits, Yukon Wild Fur and local trappers, Brittany Vogt of Crux Fibres, Yukon Wildlife Preserve – Wildlife Rehabilitation and a community that is wild at heart!

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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Northern Neck Tubes

Northern Neck Tubes

Northern Neck Tubes

6 min read

The Visitor Services team is working hard to connect with local artist to bring the connections to nature home with you. We strongly feel that by taking the time to explore these partnerships we can create unique items that guests to the Preserve can take home all while knowing their purchase in the Preserve’s Little Gift Shop not only supports these northern people but all revenue from the retail sales goes back into the operations of the Preserve, supporting the northern animals in our care.

Right now the Preserve does not do online sales. We’re a really small team that is situated out of town, and with some staff also living out of town, doing online sales and shipping feels a bit outside our capacities for the time being. 

• • •

Photo of moose in water.

This artist collaboration was an incredibly fun and colourful one – Niki Parry was the perfect artist to do a neck tube collab with given her use of silhouttes on vibrant beautiful and colourful landscapes.

Whatever you call them – neck tubes, neck gaiters, buffs, neck warmers (and now, sometimes facemasks) they are a staple of year-round outdoor gear and you can never have too many.

• • •

We reached out to Niki in September of 2020 to see if she was interesed in working on this idea with YWP. Niki jumped on it and in the following months we started sorting out details of design ideas and applications. 

We sought after Yukon Wildlife Preserve inspiration from the landscape and the animals. 

Two photos inspired Niki especially once we decided what species we wanted to capture. 

• • •

Photo credit: J.Paleczny

Niki Parry is a visual artist working primarily in acrylic paint.  Her artwork represents natural scenes with an element of abstract.  She works with bright vibrant colours and creates dynamic abstract landscapes utilizing silhouettes to create an intense contrast and bring the scene to life.    

Niki has worked with many different types of artwork throughout her life, drawn primarily to the projects where she can focus on and explore colour.  Niki was introduced to fluid acrylics six years ago and fell in love.  The combination of playing with colours in that dynamic fluid form and the process of creating joyful natural landscapes from these images had her hooked.  She has been intensively developing her painting skills and techniques ever since. 

• • •

Photo of team providing care for moose in the field.

Niki’s artistic process involves two separate components, one for creating the background and the second for hand painting to complete the scene.  The backgrounds are created with fluid acrylic paint, where acrylic paint is diluted with mediums to become runny. 

• • •

Photo of staff using stethoscope to listen to moose heart rate.

The paint is then poured onto the canvas, rather than using a brush.  It is then manipulated by moving the canvas around with gravity and other tools to mix the paint on the canvas.   Once the background is completed, then it takes 24 to 48 hours to dry before it can be moved, or else the paint will slide off the canvas.

• • •

The secondary process involves working with the background to determine how the final painting will come together.  Generally there is a plan for the background; however, with fluid paint it can be difficult to completely control all the exact details of how it will come together.  This is part of the beauty of the process, the balance between control and working with what presents itself.  The design for the painting is finalized once the background is fully dried, and the final plan for the composition is created.  The final image is created with acrylic brush painting. 

• • •

Photo of staff using stethoscope to listen to moose heart rate.

We worked with Corina at Taku Sports Group Inc. and Bula Canada to take Niki’s artwork and make it perfectly fit onto two different neck gaiters – one, a single layer do it all tube featuring two moose and a double layer, reversible fleece perfect for winter warmth featuring of course the northern iconic caribou!

• • •

These special neck tubes will be available at the Preserve’s Little Gift Shop. Niki will also have a few on hand at both the Cranberry Fair and the Spruce Bog Christmas Boutique. Both are great events to check out and support local buinesses, and artists like Niki Parry! 

• • •

Photo of staff using stethoscope to listen to moose heart rate.

Niki’s goal for creating artwork is to bring a smile to your face and lift your spirits.  She finds a great deal of happiness in creating these images and loves to share her uplifting artwork with others.

We are so grateful  (and pretty darn excited) to have worked with Niki and share her vision. We endeavour to source and support local and share a product that helps you tackle all the outdoor feats while looking extremely fashionable and warm.

From Bula – Stay Warm, Play Longer

• • •

Single Layer tube                           $38
Double Layer reversible tube       $44

Photo of staff using stethoscope to listen to moose heart rate.
Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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Yukon Wildlife Preserve
Box 20191
Whitehorse, Yukon
Y1A 7A2

Proud member of:

With the support of:

Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

1 min video – 

This juvenile bald eagle came to the Wildlife Rehabilitation and Research Centre in early July after it was found near Icy Waters on Fish Lake road, seemingly flightless. 

An X-ray revealed an infection.  Dr. Maria Hallock started the eagle on a course of antibiotics

The eagle was X-rayed upon arrival and it was noted that the eagle was suffering from an infection in the right wing. Dr. Maria Hallock started a round of antibiotics hidden in food.  The eagle was very reluctant to consume the medication – finding the pill in the food and spitting it out, making its recovery challenging, to say the least. 

Performed after initial healing time and antibiotics bring down the infection that obscured the initial observation, this second X-ray showed a fracture to the ulna.

With more creative hiding of the medication, a week passed and a second x-ray was performed where the Animal Care team was able to see a clear fracture to the ulna, within a perfect setting and healing process.

After a  couple more weeks of antibiotics and rest – the eagle was moved to our outdoor flight pen where the individual could be seen by public.

Over the next few weeks the eagle built its flight muscles and strength with the goal of being released back in to the wild.

On August 21, the Animal Care team released the eagle successfully to the wild, in the MacIntyre marsh area, near the same location it was found.  It’s always incredibly rewarding to give wildlife a second chance at life in the wild.

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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Gifts of the North

Gifts of the North

Gifts of the North

This time last year we released a very special limited edition hat (or toque as we Canadians like to call it). It was the product of generous Yukon businesses who care about Yukon’s wildlife.  The 5 premium toques included a donation to the Preserve. They sold out in just a day and a half!

The partnerships have continued to grow and we’re really excited to release 2 different limited edition toque styles (4 available of each style) again this Christmas! These toques were made exclusively in the north, inspired by the north. The Yukon is home to incredible people who love to celebrate and honour the uniqueness of this land. This hat directly supports the diverse community that makes this place and its people so unique!

These limited edition hats go on sale at the Preserve on Friday, December 20th.

Hand-knitted in Whitehorse

Last year we were fortunate enough to connect with a very under-the-radar knitting talent, Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits located right here in Whitehorse. Liz, like the other featured small business owners, weaved from passionate hobby into notable entrepreneurs. She balances this passion with a full time job, a love of running and sharing time with friends and her fluffy companions in Yukon’s grand landscapes. Each of these 8 hats were hand knitted and fashioned by Liz Sutton, especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

 

Toque 1: Local Hand Dyed 100% Candian Merino Wool

For the first toque, Liz sourced her wool from a little northern yarn shop with a big heart called Itsy Bitsy Yarn Store, located in downtown Whitehorse. The owner, Heather Sealey pours her heart into her store, into sharing her love and knowledge of knitting to every customer she encounters, and into encouraging and inspiring the local and northern flare.

Heather prides herself on working with other local proprietors who produce yarns, locally made wood and antler buttons, other Yukon made accessories, and in the case of this hat, local hand-dyed yarns. Crux Fibres is a product of local Brittany Vogt whose little hobby quickly turned into a business, “Dyeing yarn became an avenue for my deep desire to master creative arts. Playing with professional dyes and quality yarn isn’t easy, it’s a real challenge, but once you get over that crux, that difficult part and start to see the complimentary dance in the water, a real beautiful thing happens. A tapestry of colour emerges”. Who doesn’t love when passion turns into profit and pride in a beautiful piece of art. The wool Brittany uses is 100% Canadian merino wool.

 

Toque 2: Canadian Muskox Qiviut Blend

For the second toque, Liz worked with Itsy Bitsy Yarn Store to source qiviut from Nunavut Qiviut.

Nunavut Qiviut in turn sources arctic fibres from the Kugluktuk area of the Yukon’s more eastern territorial neighbour, Nunavut. Here, and across the circumpolar north, wonderfully woolly, ice-age creatures roam the barren landscape. Muskox are formidable animals of the arctic whom managed to survive an era that most animals (including the woolly mammoth) did not. Muskox are both a majestic and extraordinary creature, not only because of its luxurious fibre but its remarkable place in history. Today, muskox continue to provide an incredible and valuable support system to the people and communities of this shared landscape.

The Inuit name for muskox is Umingmack, “the animal with skin like a beard.” The undercoat wool belonging to this animal gives it the ability to thrive in the extreme arctic environment but also is an animal harvested by Inuit’s for traditional purposes like winter sleeping mats, protein for elders and families.

Nunavut Qiviut works with these local harvesters and community members to purchase the qiviut wool for fibre production. This on the ground activity by Nunavut Qiviut supports food security, a wage economy, cultural continuity and traditional Inuit lifestyles in an ethical and fair manner.

Sustainably Trapped in the Yukon

A toque isn’t complete without a pom-pom. This year, Liz sourced furs through the Yukon Trappers Association and Yukon Wild Furs. Yukon Wild Furs donated locally and sustainably harvested lynx from Indigenous trapper and educators, George Bahm and Chris Hobbis’ trapline located in the South Canol Road area.

Owner of Yukon Wildlife Furs, Vanessa Aegirsdottir, might possibly have the smallest gift shop in the Yukon in square feet. But her mission is huge: “being an education beacon for Indigenous culture and worldviews”.

Bahm also sees great value in sharing fur harvesting practices with consumers and their relationship with the land. Wild fur trapping can be sustainable, ethically sourced and support traditional lifestyle when a fair price is offered for the fur as opposed to farmed furs.

To the people who buy them, Bahm said they’re deepening their connection to the Yukon and the people who’ve trapped for generations.

I tell people that when they’re wearing fur we ask them to be mindful of the fact that an animal has given its life so we can adorn ourselves with its feathers, with its fur and by wearing those items they’re forever in a relationship with an animal. It’s more than just a pair of earrings.

A Community That’s Wild at Heart

The Yukon Wildlife Preserve is a non-profit charitable organization. In the 1970’s Danny Nowlan started accepting and caring for injured and orphaned wildlife at the Yukon Game Farm. Nearly 50 years later the Preserve continues to care for Yukon’s most vulnerable animals. Today we are a living centre of Yukon’s species that connects more than 30,000 visitors to the natural world, each year.

Find out more about what the  donation with the purchase of the hat means for the Preserve at donate.yukonwildlife.ca .

These toques represents so much more than fashion and warmth! It symbolizes the values and lifestyles of this unique territory and the people and animals that call it home. By purchasing this hat, you are supporting the people, their businesses and the land and animals of the north – Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits, Itsy-Bitsy Yarn Store, Yukon Wild Fur and local trappers, Brittany Vogt of Crux Fibres, Nunavut Qiviut, Yukon Wildlife Preserve – Wildlife Rehabilitation and a community that is wild at heart!

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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Strong Supporters – Major Donation

Strong Supporters – Major Donation

Strong Supporters – Major Donation

A small ceremony took place at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve the morning of August 19 just before families took off on the annual Run Wild event. On this sunny day, Steve Smyth and his son Andrew presented to the Preserve’s President, Alexandra Tait and Executive Director, Jake Paleczny a cheque for $25,000, the largest donation by anyone in the history of the Preserve since it was turned over to the Operating Society in 2004.

The Wildlife Preserve was the dream of the original owners, Danny Nowlan, who established what was then called the Yukon Game Farm in 1967. One of the reasons for the Yukon government’s purchase of the Preserve and the establishment of the Operating Society to oversee its management is the extraordinary costs of looking after injured animals that are frequently brought to the Preserve for rehabilitation. This is a very expensive service that the Preserve provides to Yukon, and one that is not supported by the base funding granted to the Operating Society by the Government of Yukon. It is for this reason that the contribution by Steve, his wife Julie and son Andrew is so critical to the work of the Preserve.

President, Alexandra Tait welcomes participants to the 2019 Run Wild event and introduces Steven Smyth, donor and long-time supporter of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

We have an incredible group of Yukoners who have embraced the Preserve as a jewel in Yukon, whether for research, education, animal rehabilitation, tourism or recreation. There are many quiet supporters who have donated both time and money to this institution. Steve and his family have stepped up in a big way to generously give to this great cause. Steve is one of those quiet Yukoners who continues to give to our society. He moved to Yukon in 1971 and worked in management positions in government until he retired in 2007, including the Department of Environment around the time that the Preserve was purchased. In those days he was responsible for the Preserve assets as the Operating Society was set up to take this over.

In other ways Steve has given much to this territory. He has been a Justice of the Peace for 38 years and has held appointments on a number of boards: Yukon Legal Education (14 years); the Law Society of Yukon (18 years); Motor Transport Board (7 years); Arctic Institute of North America (lifetime member); Yukon Agriculture Association Board; Yukon Science Institute; Dispute Resolution Board; Yukon JP Association Executive, Family Mediation Canada, Mediation Yukon, and the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (Yukon Regional Group), and; Friends of the Yukon Archives Society.

The foundation for his commitment comes from his family. His father and mother, Ron and Evelyn, worked for many years in the Yukon public service. His brother, Randy, spent years building Yukon infrastructure for General Enterprises and other construction companies and spent time farming outside of Dawson. Driven by his strong interest in the evolution of government in Yukon, Steve is the co-author of Yukon’s Constitutional Foundations. He has published many papers on similar governance topics, and completed a PhD in Northern Studies from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in 2005. He links this interest in Yukon’s constitutional and political evolution with institutions like the Wildlife Preserve. So many issues relating to this evolution, whether Land Claims, Court decisions on topics like the Peel Watershed, and Devolution of land and resources from Canada to Yukon, are all part of a vision for better local management of natural resources and habitat which are central values in the continued operation of the Wildlife Preserve. 

He sees the Preserve as pivotal to the experiential learning curriculum of the Yukon Education system.

Asked about his 30 year vision for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve, Steve feels it can be an internationally recognized research facility in a world where the impact of climate change on habitat and wildlife is central. He sees a future with stronger ties with other academic research institutions such as the Arctic Institute of North America and other southern Universities with northern research programs. He sees the Preserve as pivotal to the experiential learning curriculum of the Yukon Education system.

Steve’s wish is that the Operating Society will find the resources to write a book on the history of the Preserve to capture its interesting and instructive journey.

On a personal note, Steve really enjoys the moose. He would like to see wolverines at the Preserve if the opportunity presents.

Ultimately, Steve and his family bring their core conviction to Yukon and to the Preserve. The Board of the Wildlife Preserve wish to express their deep gratitude for the family’s commitment to the future of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

Kirk Cameron

Kirk Cameron

Board of Directors

Kirk Cameron (pictured second from right) has been a long-standing board member and supporter of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve. Kirk was a founding Director in the Preserve’s transition. Born in Yukon, Kirk’s professional path has been predominantly working as a public servant across Canada’s Northwest. This has allowed him to work along side Steve and some
shared visions for the Yukon and the Yukon Wildlife Preserve. Kirk is also a strong silent supporter of our community.

board@yukonwildlife.ca

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The Gift That Gives Back

The Gift That Gives Back

The Gift That Gives Back

This limited edition, very special hat (or toque as we Canadians like to call it), was made exclusively in the Yukon. This hat directly supports the diverse community that makes this place and its people so unique!

Hand-knitted in Whitehorse

The Yukon Campfire Hat buffalo plaid pattern was created by Liz Sutton, Treeline Knits of Whitehorse. Liz is an avid knitter and hiker living in the Yukon and creating an array of beautiful hand-knit products. The buffalo plaid design has been her most popular pattern. “I love the truly overwhelming response these hats got, it wasn’t something I expected. I really just started out making the pattern because I wanted a fun hat for camping.” Each of the 5 hats were hand knitted and fashioned by Liz Sutton, especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

Canadian Merino Wool

Liz sourced her wool from a little northern yarn shop with a big heart called Itsy Bitsy Yarn Store, located in downtown Whitehorse. Not only was fashion important in creating the hat, but of course function – the hat is made of hand-dyed Merino wool. Merino wool is known to be the less itchy and supreme warmth performance type of wool.

Sustainably Trapped in the Yukon

Liz works with local trappers for the final touch – the fashion focused pom-pom. For these hats, black wolf fur pom-poms were made by Liz. She sourced these from an ethical and sustainable black wolf trapline known as Dulac Trapping – a family run trapline on Cultus Lake located on Łù’àn Män – Kluane Lake. Trapping is an important, self-sustaining lifestyle in the North, integrated in the landscape. Dulac Trapping engages with schools for experiential learning opportunities, teaching kids how to trap, the importance of understanding and respecting the land and animals from which our life is sustained, and wilderness survival.

    

A Community That’s Wild at Heart

The Yukon Wildlife Preserve is a non-profit charitable organization. In the 1970’s Danny Nowlan started accepting and caring for injured and orphaned wildlife at the Yukon Game Farm. Nearly 50 years later the Preserve continues to care for Yukon’s most vulnerable animals. Today we are a living centre of Yukon’s species that connects more than 30,000 visitors to the natural world, each year.

Find out more about what the $100 donation means for the Preserve at donate.yukonwildlife.ca ((This is an example of a footnote!)).

This toque represents so much more than fashion and warmth! It symbolizes the values and lifestyles of this unique territory and the people and animals that call it home. By purchasing this hat you are supporting 5 fold – Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits, Itsy-Bitsy Yarn Store, Dulac Trapping, Yukon Wildlife Preserve – Wildlife Rehabilitation and a community that is wild at heart!

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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