Golden Eagle Gets Second Chance

Golden Eagle Gets Second Chance

Golden Eagle Gets Second Chance

Photo credit:  L. Caskenette

A golden eagle was admitted Wednesday evening, November 24th 2021, to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. This individual, who is quite a bit bigger than the last golden eagle in our care, was found by a member of the public in the middle of the road, in between Haines Junction and Mendenhall area.

Upon initial assessment of the animal there appeared to be no broken bones but was severely hypothermic. Given it was found in the middle of the HWY, Dr. Maria Hallock guesses it was perhaps struck by a vehicle, concussed and resting in place but ultimately becoming weaker due to extended immobility in the extreme cold. While its not certain how long the animal was there for it was enough for the animal to be near frozen state upon its discovery. 

On Thursday morning the eagle was given additional fluids, on top of the fluids it received upon its arrival the evening prior. Some chicken was fed to the eagle in the later part of the Thursday along with a quail. 

On Friday the eagle appeared more responsive and alert and eager to eat by itself. This care and close observation occurred inside the Rehabilitation building where Dr. Maria Hallock waited for the animal to defecate – poop, for assessing continued signs of improvement and health in the GI tract – all good there by the way! 

The eagle will spend the next several days in the Centre being closed monitored. While during the day it will spend time in an outside care room, in the evenings it will come inside. 

If all continues well in its progress and recovery a release back to the wild could possibly happen sometime next week. 

Had this person not taken the steps they did, including assessing the animals from a safe distance and calling Conservation Officers and subsequently the Preserve, this eagle would very likely have succumbed to the elements or get fatally struck by a vehicle.

We are so grateful to live among a community that values wildlife, that cares about our natural world – it’s our mission, to connect people to the natural world and everyday we’re inspired by the landscape, animals and people that make this incredible territory, the Yukon, a place that is wild at heart <3

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Meet The North: The Gift that Keeps Giving!

Each of the last 2 years we have had the immense pleasure of connecting with northerners passionate about promoting local, connecting people and place and supporting the Yukon Wildlife Preserve and Yukon’s wildlife.  The team is back again this year with new, special and very limited edition Yukon-inspired and Yukon-made wool wear.  

Only 3 hats available!

Birds Eye View small batch dye by Crux Fibres with pattern, Autumn Weaves beanie by Lindsay Faciane; hand knitted especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve by Liz Sutton adorned with indigenous Yukon-run trapline, sustainably trapped lynx fur pom.

SOLD!

The one-of-a-kind Borealis Hat and Mitt pattern by Liz Sutton can be found on Ravelry if you wish to do your own pattern yourself but the particular Aurora and Blue Lagoon hand-dye from Crux Fibre is one of a kind, especially for the Preserve adorned with sustainably and ethically Yukon trapped coyote fur pom!

The partnerships of these unique businesses and people have continued to grow and we’re really excited to release a limited edition toque and special toque and mitt combo for this holiday season – gift giving that keeps giving! These beautiful wool items were made exclusively in the north, inspired by the north and are entwined with passions and care throughout the entire process. The Yukon is home to incredible people who love to celebrate and honour the uniqueness of this land. These knitting wonders directly support the diverse community that makes this place and its people so unique!

These limited edition hats go on sale at the Preserve only on Saturday November 13.

Hand-knitted in Whitehorse

For the 3rd year in a row we are working with the ever-expanding knitting talent, Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits located right here in Whitehorse. Liz has been the cornerstone of this annual project. Year after year, despite a full time job, dog-momming, life duties and personal outdoor passion and pursuits, Liz is eager to weave through it all and dedicate time and energy into lovingly producing one-of-a-kind hand knitted and fashioned wool products, especially for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

Northern Inspiration in Hand Dyed 100% Merino Wool

Crux Fibres is a truly northern inspired product of born and raised Yukoner, Brittany Vogt. Her knitting hobby and desire to create her own spectrum of colours inspired by Yukon places close to her heart quickly turned into a business for Brittany. 

“The art of dyeing yarn has become a great avenue to continue my creative expression” and this particular small-batch dye was influenced by a place that holds an extra special connection for Brittany. The “Birds Eye View” she called this small-batch dye, in which Liz used to make the 3 toques, was inspired by place and time. Atop Caribou Mountain overlooking Bennett Lake, on the traditional territory of the Carcross Tagish First Nation,  Brittany realized she was going crazy for John, her now husband. Indeed, intertwined in love, years later a few pictures would further inspire the beauty and colour of this yarn. 

Brittany’s inspiration supported through Bennett Lake art from
Left: Edna Bardell Right: Ben Nelms

Every small-batch dye of 100% merino wool yarn originates from South America. Brittany worked hard to source yarn ethically and extend her values of supporting small and mindful businesses like her own.  The one-of-a-kind Aurora Borealis Hat and Mitts used a special blue lagoon dye Brittany did. The very nature of hand-dying in small batches creates variations from skein to skein (even those dyed in the same dye bath) adding even greater uniquesness to each finished product. 

Trapping – In Love & Tradition 

The finishing touches of such a divine piece of art involves a trapline, and a commitment to love, learning, and educating. It may be just a fur pom that adorns these hats but for Vanessa of Yukon Wild Furs it’s an opportunity; it’s the decision to embark on a role as an educator; fulfilling a responsibility while generating a (somewhat unexpected) life from the bounty of the land. Vanessa, along with owning and operating a small store where she sells her art, tirelessly works towards educating and connecting people to a lifestyle rooted in tradition whenever she has the opportunity. This opportunity and responsibility is shared along-side her now husband, George Bahm who is Teslin Tlingit and harvests from the land on his trappline in southern Yukon.

Photo Credit: Alistair Maitland

I have merely glimpsed a fraction of the beauty and teachings that await on the trapline. But I know that this traditional practice, with its skill, stories and lessons, will be lost if the wild fur industry continues as it is. My hope is to protect the importance of what is out on the trail, in the quiet of a fresh snowfall, so that future generations of fur harvesters can reconnect with their ancestors and the teachings that have endured for thousands of years. Trapping is so much more than just harvesting fur.

Photo Credit: Erik Pinkerton

When the opportunity came to adorn these hats (for a second year in a row) with sustainable, locally and indegenous trapped wild fur, Vanessa did not hesitate to support. She’s only a single human in this world but one with a strong, deeply rooted goal of using this polarizing issue as a springboard into meaningful conversations wherever they can occur from her store to our Little Gift Shop where these hats will be sold.

To learn more about Vanessa, George and their shared goals check out Truth About Fur

A Community That’s Wild at Heart

The Yukon Wildlife Preserve is a non-profit charitable organization. In the 1970’s Danny Nowlan started accepting and caring for injured and orphaned wildlife at the Yukon Game Farm. Nearly 50 years later the Preserve continues to care for Yukon’s most vulnerable animals. Today we are a living centre of Yukon’s species that connects tens of thousands of people, from our backyard to across the world, to the natural world, each year.

Find out more about what the  donation with the purchase of the hat means for the Preserve at donate.yukonwildlife.ca 

 These toques represent so much more than just a (stunning) fashion accessory to keep your head warm! It embodies your choice to value the connections with the people and places of this territory; to support local; to share a love of something on a deeper level; to support Yukon’s wildlife. By purchasing this hat, you are supporting the people, their businesses and the land and animals of the north – Liz Sutton of Treeline Knits, Yukon Wild Fur and local trappers, Brittany Vogt of Crux Fibres, Yukon Wildlife Preserve – Wildlife Rehabilitation and a community that is wild at heart!

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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A Day with an Animal Care Assistant

A Day with an Animal Care Assistant

A Day with an Animal Care Assistant

8 minute read.

My name is Abbey, I am a part-time animal care assistant and part-time wildlife interpreter here at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve for the summer of 2021. I am a biology major at the University of Winnipeg. Fall 2021 I start my second year of my degree. One of my goals in life is to visit all three territories in Canada, with Nunavut already crossed off the Yukon was next on my list. The Wildlife Preserve offers me a chance to put my education to practice and help me decide which route in the biological field I want to pursue (I bet by the end of this post you can guess which route I am leaning towards). This post will discuss what I have experienced as an animal care assistant here at the Preserve and hopefully give some insight about what goes on behind the scenes for you the reader.

You may have been on the Preserve and been at the right place and time to see the animal care team at work. The animal care team works hard to keep the Preserve and rehabilitation animal’s happy and healthy. Working in animal care is never a stagnant job, animal needs change, babies are born, new rehabilitation animals arrive making this job ever changing. This post will follow my day around the preserve as an Animal Care Assistant starting in the Preserve’s Wildlife Rehabilitation and Research Centre, down to the first half of the lower loop up to the upper loop and back down to the second half to complete our figure eight.

This map shows the homes of each of the species in our collection located on the front and back loops of the figure 8 trail network. The Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre is located in staff access area.

Rehabilitation Centre

The Rehabilition Centre in the shadows of a golden eagle patient in the large outdoor aviary. Photo credit: J.Paleczny

To start off the day I check the animals that are in rehabilitation care to make sure their habitats are clean and that the animals are well – observation of animal behaviour is a very important role in animal care.  In the rehabilitation center the animals we look after often have strict eating schedules which dictates what is done during my day and when. An example of this is the moose we received in late May of 2021. This calf is not shy and is always excited to eat! He gets almost too excited, so we have to slow him down. It’s exactly like when your puppy eats way too fast and you have to find ways to slow them down. After feeding, we watch him until he defecates and lays down, this is an important step to ensure he is healthy and progressing how we would expect him to. As you continue reading this post you will recognize the particular theme of observing the animals’ behaviors: this is to ensure the health of the animals in our care.

Next step is to prepare the feed for the collection animals. The caribou females eat a beet pulp mixture that you just add water to and it expands twice or three times the original amount. It almost looks like that elephant toothpaste science experiment but in slow motion! We also mix that with donated fresh fruit pulp. We’re very lucky to receive support from so many local organizations including grocery stores. Fun fact, caribou don’t like citrus or ginger, they’ll eat around it and leave it behind (so we sort that out and give it to the moose).

Oranges donated from Wykes Independent Grocer.

We then prepare the carnivore food. The arctic fox, red foxes and lynx all get a healthy amount of red meat and white meat. Once the food is prepared, which means to cut it up, weigh and portion it out per species it’s placed in the fridge for later.

The silver fox enjoys lunch and is lip licking satisfied thanks to Animal Care staff food prep. Photo credit: L.Caskenette

We then head to the hay barn to get pellets for the muskox and bison. These two species don’t have a feed station attached to their habitats like the other ungulates, they are a bit too rough on their surroundings, so that means pellets are not stored at the habitat in the protective feed stations. 

Getting pellets is no small feat, the first time I tried to fill a bucket it took me four tries to get a full bucket! For reference I am 5’0, and the bags are as tall as I am when they are full. Once we have our pellets ready, we load up the animal care truck and begin our tour around the preserve.

Front Loop

In this portion of the front loop or sometimes called the lower loop we will encounter the elk, bison, mule deer and moose in that order as we start counterclockwise on the loop. We begin first by making sure all the elk are present, look alert and healthy and then check their hay and water levels.

Then we stop at the bison who are usually laying or standing around as a group. These animals get their pellets poured in two straight, long lines on the ground so there is plenty of room to share between these big, big eaters. We hang around the habitat to count the animals and check them for any changes in behaviour. This is an important opportunity to make observations in any changes of health that can be reported to Dr. Maria Hallock, our full-time veterinarian. If anything is astray Dr. Hallock will investigate further but most days I get to see and learn the amazing behaviours of these animals.

After that, we head over to the mule deer where we first check their water and then head into the feeding station where we find their stored feed, tools, and the animal information sheet. Each animal information sheet is specific to the species, we count how many animals we see and how much they are fed. We also take the time to write down any observations of the animals whether it’s a mule deer with diarrhea or a moose acting out of character all observations are recorded and forwarded to Maria.

We use a scoop instead of a bucket to pour feed into their troughs (thank goodness). In the same shed we also feed our moose and again we scoop their feed into their troughs although they have a much bigger scoop so it’s important to keep everything separate.

Back Loop

In the back loop we will find our thinhorn sheep, caribou and mountain goats. We move to our thinhorn sheep where we wear booties and gloves to protect them from outside pathogens. This species tends to be more susceptible to bacteria’s so the Preserve biosecurity is heightened here when entering their habitat.

Left photo shows a thinhorn sheep sedated for a check up and hoof trimming. Right shows Outdoor Operations staff working on fencing within the ewe habitat. Both photos show staff wearing booties and gloves to help protect the animals against pathogens. Photo credit: J.Paleczny

This species has both pellets and hay in their feeding station. Learning to use a pitchfork has been a learning curve! Who knew something with so much space between each prong could carry so much?

We clean and remove excess hay and feces from the feeding stations which we compost. We head on over to the caribou (who were hoping will have babies this year) and whose food we mixed earlier.

Caribou cow and calf from summer 2019. Photo credit: J.Paleczny

We go into their habitat and create piles of the beet pulp. We then head to the mountain goats who are usually high up in the cliffs making counting them a tricky task! This species gets hay and pellets and a clean up just like the sheep do.

Mountain goats hang out on the cliff – it’s safety and sometimes sun bathing! Photo credit: L.Caskenette

Although beware of Geronimo whose patience for humans is very thin! Every animal has a personality and some are more memorable than others. The first time I met him I thought he was ill only to find out he was just in a bad mood (he always is – he’s a goat). To be fair when I say bad mood, he’s really just displaying signs of normal defensive behaviour that has been somewhat elevated due to his story as a kid.

Carnivore Corner

The back loop can be further divided into the Carnivore Corner where we will find the lynx, arctic foxes, and red foxes. The carnivore corner is where the most fun feedings occur! Sometimes we do themed enrichment feedings – check out our Halloween one!

We stop at the lynx who are usually waiting by the fence for food, I swear they hear the truck and spot the green jackets and come running! The females are most expectant and the odd time the male will be waiting too but he’s a little more reserved.

Lynx come in for feeding, intent but smooth movement towards the food. Photo credit: L.Caskenette

We head over to the arctic foxes who look super cute but throw in a piece of red meat into the mix and their carnivore side comes out. You can watch the arctic foxes feeding here! 

Very cute, but also very ready for food! Photo credit: L.Caskenette

Next, we head over to the red foxes who are the funniest to feed! ‘Definitely’ the red fox makes the cutest yipping noises when he sees you pull up! What does a fox say you might ask? It sounds something similar to a yip and laugh mixed together. He will race around to get food before the silver fox does, I swear that silver fox has more patience than I’ve ever seen.

The red fox is always ready for food and will eat as much as he possibly can. What he can’t, he will grab and go stash it. Don’t worry, the silver fox gets his share – he goes and finds the red foxes stash in his own time. Photo credit: L.Caskenette

Front Loop – Round 2

 In the second half of the lower loop we feed the muskox and check in on the elk and bison habitats as we head back to the animal care building. We then head to my favourite animal, the muskox, which is the best part of my day in animal care. These guys have a special metal structure for handling and feeding that limits contact, increases safety for staff and provides shelter for the muskox and muskox supplemental feed.

Muskox do not have feed stations. Instead, they have a metal handling and feeding structure to ensure the safety of both staff and muskox along with the longetivey of the building! Photo credit: J.Paleczny

 Muskox are incredibly fierce with a social order that is largely based on an aggressive hierarchy but they are also protective of their herd. There’s nothing more intimidating than a territorial, protective and potential in rut (mating season) muskox so it’s best to keep your distance.

If the bison or the elk were too far away on my first look I will spend this time counting and watch for behavioral changes on this part of the loop. 

All while this is happening, we have to be wary of our time for feeding our rehab animals on tight schedules. There is also time during the day to do some other tasks like creating habitats for our rehabilitation animals or doing some spring cleaning in some of the collection animals’ habitats. By the time this is all done my arm and back muscles are jelly and I am ready to hand off the torch to the next animal care assistant. 

To conclude my time here at Yukon Wildlife Preserve is an experience I will never forget from feeding my favourite animal (the muskox) to finding a new passion in helping care for animals. While I came for a summer, for work, the Yukon and it’s incredible fauna hold a strong place in my heart, summer 2022 can’t come soon enough!  In the meantime and year-round you can go behind the scenes and witness the extreme care and diligent work that is required by Animal Care staff to care for all the animals at the Preserve through a variety of experience and tour options – check it out! 

Abbey Mondor

Abbey Mondor

Wildlife Interpreter & Animal Care Assistant

Abbey joined the preserve the summer of 2021 to continue a lifelong dream of experiencing all three of Canada’s territories. With Nunavut already crossed off, the yukon was the next on her list! Abbey is currently studying biology at the University of Winnipeg making this experience a perfect place for her to put her education to practice! Abbey works both in visitor services and animal care where her desire to care for wildlife has grown. Her favourite part about working on the preserve is learning about all the personalities of the animals here.

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Hungry Hungry Hipp… Moose!

Hungry Hungry Hipp… Moose!

Hungry Hungry Hipp… Moose!

2 minutes video plus short introduction and photo timeline.

He’s hungry – drinking 4pints of milk replacer in 1 minute and 37seconds. This happens 5 times a day!

On May 24, 2021, the Yukon Wildlife Preserve received a baby male moose from Conservation Officer Services. The Preserve’s Veterinarian, Dr. Maria Hallock, reports the young moose is very small – likely only a couple of days old – but appears to be healthy and is eating well.

 

After finding the young moose on May 24th, a member of the public ended up taking the moose back to their home. They called the Preserve, which referred their call to CO Services. CO Services collected the moose and brought it to the Preserve on the evening of May 24th. Read the full Press Release.

It’s always preferable for a moose like this to have the opportunity to grow up with its mom in the wild,” says Paleczny. “But our team is working hard to provide the best life we can for this little moose.”. . .

Male moose calf – day 2 at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve’s Wildlife Rehabilition Centre. Photo Credit: J.Paleczny.

Male moose calf – day 10 at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve’s Wildlife Rehabilition Centre. Photo Credit: J.Paleczny.

Male moose calf – day 67 at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve’s Wildlife Rehabilition Centre. Photo Credit: J.Paleczny.

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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Busy Times & Hungry Critters in Care

Busy Times & Hungry Critters in Care

Busy Times & Hungry Critters in Care

This story was originally published July 10 2021 in the e-blast newsletter to Yukon Wildlife Preserve’s membership.

Are you a member but don’t receive these email Newsletters?  Contact us at info@yukonwildlife.ca to update your email preferences.

Mew Gull x2

Location found – Downtown.

Admitted on June 15th after the nest was lost. Conservation Officers brought the animals to the Preserve.

This pair are in an outdoor aviary where they are growing fast and eat mice 3 times a day.

• • •

Juvenile Mew Gull with Wing Injury

Also found downtown but admitted more recently on July 7th. This individual has fractures to its right wing and a large hematoma but depsite its injuries is in good body and remains active and alert. 

The animal is on low dose medication for pain and inflammation and the wing is immobilized. It remains under observation before it will move in with the other gulls outside. 

• • •

Boreal Owl

Admitted June 28th, this tiniest of Yukon owls was rescued from an attack by a domestic dog. While the animal came in with mild ataxia (lack of coordination) it’s doing relatively well. It’s missing primary and secondary feathers on both wings but with time and regular mice feedings twice a day the owl should be a good candidate for release when ready.

• • •

Juvenile Northern Flicker

Location found – Takhini Hot Springs Rd area. 

Admitted on June 27th after the young animal fell out of its nest and was at risk of predation. 

Plan for recovery and release with time and lots of mealworm feedings throughout the day and small mice.

• • •

Coyote Pups

2 male coyote pups, about 6 – 8 weeks old, were admitted to the Rehabilitation Centre on July 5th after they were found, suspected to be orphaned, in the Marsh Lake area by members of the public. 

The pups eat 3 times a day and their appetites are growing. Along with a puppy formula, every feeding they consume 4 mice and 2 whole quail each. 

• • •

Each of these animals face challenging times ahead but the Wildlife Preserve Animal Care Team, including Veterinarian, Dr. Maria Hallock, are working 7 days a week, near 20 hours a day to ensure each of these animals are given the best possible chance for recovery and release back into the wild. 

We could use your support to aid in these animal’s recovery – please consider donating. Help us keep Yukon wild at heart ♥

• • •

Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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A Convocation of Eagles

A Convocation of Eagles

A Convocation of Eagles

What do the dates; August 7th, September 21st, and October 20th have in common?  Well, each of these days the Yukon Wildlife Preserve’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre received a new patient, with each those being an eagle. It started with the Golden Eagles arrival from Watson Lake, followed by a Bald Eagle from Jake’s Corner, and another Bald Eagle from Mayo.  While an arrival of an animal, into the centre for care by the team at the Preserve, isn’t distinctive; it is unusual to receive an influx of eagles in the fall.

Seen from left to right is the Golden Eagle, the younger Bald Eagle with scapular injury from Jake’s Corner, and the older Bald Eagle with carpal infection from Mayo.

Over the years, the Rehabilitation Centre has admitted many eagles – both golden and bald. Some of these occasions have occurred to eaglets, some adults. Some of these have been due to injury to the individual – like from a nest blowing over in strong winds (they’re nests are built over years and with time can weigh hundreds of pounds, which for our small northern trees can sometimes be just too much to support).1https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/eagle-nesting-young/ Often times, we do not know the circumstances around an animals ailment but can gain insight from x-rays as to why an animal might be behaving differently than we might expect – like the successful juvenile bald eagle rehabilitation from summer 2020. A common thread for many of these eagles is admittance timing – usually in the Spring and Summer. 
Several months have passed since the three birds Fall time admittance. This time has allowed each eagle recovery, to some degree but there’s much road ahead still for them each. We’ll start first with the younger, (white with brown head) Bald Eagle from Jake’s Corner.  A fracture to the scapular caused the animal to be flightless in the wild. The injury has healed. The wing was wrapped for 2 months to immobilize the wing but this does cause muscle atrophy – just like in humans who are casted following a bone break. The eagle was contained in a small aviary to help reduce its movements to maintain fracture alignment and eventual bone fusion.
Once this stage of recovery was met, the eagle was moved into the large aviary. This is an important phase of the recovery process for the bird –  movement and flight tests. This individual can fly, and will spend the rest of the winter building up flight muscles in the aviary to support its probable return to the wild in the spring!
The older (full white head) Bald Eagle who suffered from severe chronic infection of the right carpal joint was initially treated with a small hope that even though the integrity of the joint was compromised the eagle might still be able to fly well enough and survive in the wild after the infection was controlled and the wing healed. However, based on most current radiographic imaging and physical exam, done by Dr. Maria Hallock and the Animal Care team, the prognosis is poor. While the infection is cleared and the joint has healed, its integrity is compromised – this will prevent the eagle from being able to fly uninhibited. Observations of the animal in the large aviary has seen it able to gain lift up to 6 feet and fly off the perch within the aviary but unable to maintain latitude for more than 20 feet. 
The Preserve will continue to care for this individaul through the remainder of the winter. We will continue to monitor and observe its behaviour.
Finally, the Golden Eagle has had the longest and most challenging recovery of the three. While we are happy to report that the left foot has recovered from the infection due to porcupine quills; the right foot is severely compromised due to the infection. This has resulted in multiple bone dissolution and loss of the skeletal and ligamentous integrity of the foot and consequently loss of its function. The bird can perch but cannot grasp effectively with the right foot. The bird still has a long way to its full recovery. At this time it does not look probable for the bird to be released back into the wild sucessfully due to this loss of functionality in the foot – an important tool for a bird of bird such as this to capture its food to survive.
The x-ray image of the Golden Eagle’s feet shows significantly compromised structure between the right and the left. The left foot was imaged with the banadaging on his feet still. The Golden Eagle is observed to be perching, and with the other birds, more and more. This is a postive progression from when he was often observed resting on stomache and on the ground, rathern than higher perch.
Each of these birds are on their own path to recovery. The Preserve continues to provide care through, mostly now, feeding and observation. These birds eat a lot! If you are able to support the ongoing care of these animals please consider donating to the Wildlife Rehabiliation and Resaearch Centre Fund.

While we progress through winter and meet spring the Preserve’s Animal Care team will reevaluate each individual and their release back to the wild or the alternative. The alternatives could include remaining at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve to live out their life and offer education and an opportunity to personally connect with such a magnificent creature. This will be a significant investment, up to a 25 year commitment, given the birds average lifespan and food requirements, however that the Preserve may not be able to provide this given the expenses. Another alternative may be to place them in another animal care facility or CAZA accredited institution.  Time will tell, to be continued . . .

Photo credits:  L. Caskenette
Lindsay Caskenette

Lindsay Caskenette

Manager of Visitor Services

Lindsay joined the Wildlife Preserve team March 2014. Originally from Ontario, she came to the Yukon in search of new adventures and new career challenges. Lindsay holds a degree in Environmental Studies with honours from Wilfrid Laurier University and brings with her a strong passion to share what nature, animals and the environment can teach us.

867-456-7400
lindsay@yukonwildlife.ca

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