Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

Rehabilitation – A Wild Success

1 min video – 

This juvenile bald eagle came to the Wildlife Rehabilitation and Research Centre in early July after it was found near Icy Waters on Fish Lake road, seemingly flightless. 

An X-ray revealed an infection.  Dr. Maria Hallock started the eagle on a course of antibiotics

The eagle was X-rayed upon arrival and it was noted that the eagle was suffering from an infection in the right wing. Dr. Maria Hallock started a round of antibiotics hidden in food.  The eagle was very reluctant to consume the medication – finding the pill in the food and spitting it out, making its recovery challenging, to say the least. 

Performed after initial healing time and antibiotics bring down the infection that obscured the initial observation, this second X-ray showed a fracture to the ulna.

With more creative hiding of the medication, a week passed and a second x-ray was performed where the Animal Care team was able to see a clear fracture to the ulna, within a perfect setting and healing process.

After a  couple more weeks of antibiotics and rest – the eagle was moved to our outdoor flight pen where the individual could be seen by public.

Over the next few weeks the eagle built its flight muscles and strength with the goal of being released back in to the wild.

On August 21, the Animal Care team released the eagle successfully to the wild, in the MacIntyre marsh area, near the same location it was found.  It’s always incredibly rewarding to give wildlife a second chance at life in the wild.

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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Moose on the Move

Moose on the Move

Moose on the Move

3:47 video
Our young orphaned moose has outgrown his room in the Preserve’s Research and Rehabilitation Centre. Today he’s on the move to a new – much larger – outdoor enclosure.  He will spend the next few months in this larger space, with food to browse as he continues to grow .  But first, we have to get him to his new home.

Learn how the Animal Care team at Yukon Wildlife Preserve safely and successfully moves this moose calf.

 

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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Wildlife Q&A

Wildlife Q&A

Wildlife Q&A

5 Min Video – 

We love finding out what makes kids curious!  We asked kids to send us their video questions about the Preserve and Yukon’s wildlife.  Watch the video to hear YWP staff answer:

  1. Do Caribou go in big groups?  And if they do, how big of groups do they go in?
  2. How do mountain goats climb?
  3. Do bunnies only eat carrots or not?
  4. How can people help the wildlife preserve?

Are you a kid? Do you have questions about Yukon Wildlife Preserve or Yukon wildlife? Send your video question to us at info@yukonwildlife.ca. (Some help from parents may be required 😉 )

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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Strong Supporters – Major Donation

Strong Supporters – Major Donation

Strong Supporters – Major Donation

A small ceremony took place at the Yukon Wildlife Preserve the morning of August 19 just before families took off on the annual Run Wild event. On this sunny day, Steve Smyth and his son Andrew presented to the Preserve’s President, Alexandra Tait and Executive Director, Jake Paleczny a cheque for $25,000, the largest donation by anyone in the history of the Preserve since it was turned over to the Operating Society in 2004.

The Wildlife Preserve was the dream of the original owners, Danny Nowlan, who established what was then called the Yukon Game Farm in 1967. One of the reasons for the Yukon government’s purchase of the Preserve and the establishment of the Operating Society to oversee its management is the extraordinary costs of looking after injured animals that are frequently brought to the Preserve for rehabilitation. This is a very expensive service that the Preserve provides to Yukon, and one that is not supported by the base funding granted to the Operating Society by the Government of Yukon. It is for this reason that the contribution by Steve, his wife Julie and son Andrew is so critical to the work of the Preserve.

President, Alexandra Tait welcomes participants to the 2019 Run Wild event and introduces Steven Smyth, donor and long-time supporter of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

We have an incredible group of Yukoners who have embraced the Preserve as a jewel in Yukon, whether for research, education, animal rehabilitation, tourism or recreation. There are many quiet supporters who have donated both time and money to this institution. Steve and his family have stepped up in a big way to generously give to this great cause. Steve is one of those quiet Yukoners who continues to give to our society. He moved to Yukon in 1971 and worked in management positions in government until he retired in 2007, including the Department of Environment around the time that the Preserve was purchased. In those days he was responsible for the Preserve assets as the Operating Society was set up to take this over.

In other ways Steve has given much to this territory. He has been a Justice of the Peace for 38 years and has held appointments on a number of boards: Yukon Legal Education (14 years); the Law Society of Yukon (18 years); Motor Transport Board (7 years); Arctic Institute of North America (lifetime member); Yukon Agriculture Association Board; Yukon Science Institute; Dispute Resolution Board; Yukon JP Association Executive, Family Mediation Canada, Mediation Yukon, and the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (Yukon Regional Group), and; Friends of the Yukon Archives Society.

The foundation for his commitment comes from his family. His father and mother, Ron and Evelyn, worked for many years in the Yukon public service. His brother, Randy, spent years building Yukon infrastructure for General Enterprises and other construction companies and spent time farming outside of Dawson. Driven by his strong interest in the evolution of government in Yukon, Steve is the co-author of Yukon’s Constitutional Foundations. He has published many papers on similar governance topics, and completed a PhD in Northern Studies from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in 2005. He links this interest in Yukon’s constitutional and political evolution with institutions like the Wildlife Preserve. So many issues relating to this evolution, whether Land Claims, Court decisions on topics like the Peel Watershed, and Devolution of land and resources from Canada to Yukon, are all part of a vision for better local management of natural resources and habitat which are central values in the continued operation of the Wildlife Preserve. 

He sees the Preserve as pivotal to the experiential learning curriculum of the Yukon Education system.

Asked about his 30 year vision for the Yukon Wildlife Preserve, Steve feels it can be an internationally recognized research facility in a world where the impact of climate change on habitat and wildlife is central. He sees a future with stronger ties with other academic research institutions such as the Arctic Institute of North America and other southern Universities with northern research programs. He sees the Preserve as pivotal to the experiential learning curriculum of the Yukon Education system.

Steve’s wish is that the Operating Society will find the resources to write a book on the history of the Preserve to capture its interesting and instructive journey.

On a personal note, Steve really enjoys the moose. He would like to see wolverines at the Preserve if the opportunity presents.

Ultimately, Steve and his family bring their core conviction to Yukon and to the Preserve. The Board of the Wildlife Preserve wish to express their deep gratitude for the family’s commitment to the future of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve.

Kirk Cameron

Kirk Cameron

Board of Directors

Kirk Cameron (pictured second from right) has been a long-standing board member and supporter of the Yukon Wildlife Preserve. Kirk was a founding Director in the Preserve’s transition. Born in Yukon, Kirk’s professional path has been predominantly working as a public servant across Canada’s Northwest. This has allowed him to work along side Steve and some
shared visions for the Yukon and the Yukon Wildlife Preserve. Kirk is also a strong silent supporter of our community.

board@yukonwildlife.ca

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Defining Who We Are

Defining Who We Are

Defining Who We Are

We have a lot to be thankful for this fall! This summer we received the largest single donation in the Preserve’s 15 year history. Steve Smyth donated a whopping $25,000 in August! Its humbling but also energizing to know how much our community values what we’re doing.

Steve and I have spoken a lot over the last year about what a donation like this would mean for us. One of the most important things was that this donation would be a signal to the rest of our community. It is a signal that the Preserve is entering a new, exciting phase of growth. It is a signal that the Preserve is ready for this kind of support.

Donation presentation by Steven Smyth to the Yukon Wildlife Preserve preceding the 8th Annual 5Km Fun Run fundraiser for Wildlife Rehabilitation. Pictured from Right to Left: Board of Director Member Melissa Croskery, Kirk Cameron, Vice President Shawna Warshawski, donor Steven Smyth, President Alexandra Tait and Executive Director, Jake Paleczny

 If that’s not enough to convince you, I think the new master plan (along with the supporting business plan and marketing plan) will! It’s all starting to come together into a cohesive, exciting vision for the next 10-15 years. We’ve got an incredible site, staff and history to work with. We’re thinking hard about how to make the experience better – as well as the role we’ll play in our community. Of course the trick is to make sure we don’t compromise the best parts of who and what we are.

So what is a “Preserve” then? We know we sometimes struggle to explain what we’re all about. “Preserve” might be a bit ambiguous, but it also means we have an opportunity to define it ourselves. So let me try this out on you:

A preserve is an enclosed area of wilderness left largely untouched, where the animals native to the area are protected, cared for and free to roam their natural habitats. This allows people to safely and respectfully get close to the wildlife, to learn about them and grow in understanding and appreciation.

I’d love to hear your thoughts? Does it align?

Drop me a line at jake@yukonwildlife.ca – I’d love to hear from you!

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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