Wildlife Q&A

Wildlife Q&A

Wildlife Q&A

5 Min Video – 

We love finding out what makes kids curious!  We asked kids to send us their video questions about the Preserve and Yukon’s wildlife.  Watch the video to hear YWP staff answer:

  1. Do Caribou go in big groups?  And if they do, how big of groups do they go in?
  2. How do mountain goats climb?
  3. Do bunnies only eat carrots or not?
  4. How can people help the wildlife preserve?

Are you a kid? Do you have questions about Yukon Wildlife Preserve or Yukon wildlife? Send your video question to us at info@yukonwildlife.ca. (Some help from parents may be required 😉 )

Jake Paleczny

Jake Paleczny

Executive Director

Jake Paleczny is passionate about interpretation and education. He gained his interpretative expertise from a decade of work in Ontario’s provincial parks in addition to a Masters in Museum Studies from the University of Toronto. His interests also extend into the artistic realm, with a Bachelor of Music from the University of Western Ontario and extensive experience in galleries and museums.

867-456-7313
jake@yukonwildlife.ca

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Cliff Hanger at Dawn!

Cliff Hanger at Dawn!

Cliff Hanger at Dawn!

The rising sun bathes the cliffs in the rosy hues of dawn.  In a manner I can only describe as precarious, I watch, heart in mouth, as the billy goat stands on his back feet while on a sheer cliff slope.  His front legs dangle loose in the air, all the better to stretch and reach the last of this year’s leaves on the aspen before him.
Of course, the billy is the male of the Rocky Mountain Goat and for him, there is nothing precarious about the scene depicted above.  Mountain goats are renowned for their surefootedness and what seems reckless and foolhardy from a human perspective is, in fact, just another day for the mountain goat.

What makes a mountain goat so agile in rocky cliff terrain?  The truth is they are well designed for their natural habitat.

Mountain Goats have short legs in relation to their overall size, placed close together; their centre of gravity is close to the ground and at the front of their body.  These things help the goat travel on narrow ledges. Muscular shoulders provide great strength for climbing. Finally, the hooves are specialized with rough textured pads and the toes have the ability to spread wide – this distributes the goat’s weight over a larger area.  Conversely, the toes can pinch together, which helps with traction when travelling downhill.

The science adds some understanding to the magic unfolding before me.  I am in awe with this landscape, this animal, this moment in time.   

Come be amazed.  Yukon Wildlife Preserve. 

Julie Kerr

Julie Kerr

Visitor Services Coordinator

Julie is a Registered Veterinary Technologist, living and working in Whitehorse since 2012. She joined the team in May 2018. She is passionate about wildlife, nature and living in a conscious manner with both. Her free time is spent outdoors observing wild animals and ecosystems; her connection to the natural world around her brings great joy – joy she loves to share with anyone interested. Honestly? Work and life blend rather seamlessly.

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